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Posts Tagged ‘being content’

Jo 17Sometimes we need a gentle reminder of what life is all about, don’t we? I know I can become so focussed on what I am doing from week to week that I can easily forget the bigger picture. And that bigger picture is important because it helps me sort out my priorities in the best possible way and reminds me why I am doing what I am doing in my life. In short, it shows me my life from God’s perspective—and that always gives me much food for thought.

Last week held one of those big picture moments for me. One day, I decided to drive up to the Blue Mountains to see my lovely, older friend Joy, who is now in a nursing home. I crept into the room she shares with another older lady and found both of them sound asleep. So what to do? I did not want to wake my friend and perhaps disorientate her, so I decided to sit and wait—and reflect.

It was peaceful in that room. At one stage, a kind staff member came in and we chatted for a few moments, but apart from that, all was quiet, except for my friend’s gentle breathing and that of the other occupant. Joy looked so small and fragile and somehow defenceless as she lay there, yet she also seemed at peace. Around her in the room, her beautiful family had placed photos of themselves and pictures of the flowers Joy loves, as well as other items she can enjoy touching or looking at. As I sat there, I remembered how much she had enriched my life and the lives of so many others too, over the years. And that is the sort of richness that really counts, isn’t it—the richness of drawing others into a closer connection with God, of passing on the utterly gracious, forgiving love of God to others?

I know that, when the time comes, Joy will be filled with delight that she is finally in God’s presence, just as I believe God will be to welcome her home. She does not have great earthly riches, but her soul is so rich in God—and that richness has been shared with so many others along the way.

That very morning before leaving home, I read the following:

Do not be overawed when a man grows rich, when the splendour of his house increases; for he will take nothing with him when he dies, his splendour will not descend with him. Psalm 49:16-17

… But godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. 1 Timothy 6:6-7

My friend Joy, and all of us, came into the world as defenceless, little babies, bringing nothing with us except ourselves. And all of us, including Joy, will leave this world equally defenceless, through age or illness or injury, taking nothing with us except ourselves. How important it is then for us to be rich in the things of God, to know deep within ourselves that we are God’s beloved children and to be content with loving and serving God and others! That indeed is ‘great gain’—the only sort of gain that really matters, when all is said and done.

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I must admit I like to find a bargain when out shopping. Perhaps it is the way I was brought up to be careful with money that is to blame. Or perhaps I am just a bit of a miser at heart—who knows? Whatever the reason, I can feel quite gleeful when I realise how much I have saved via those specials at the supermarket. And I am not above poking my nose into second-hand shops or ends-of-line clothing stores either!

Recently, I found IMG_20170908_102150034_HDRmyself in bargain hunters’ paradise, after volunteering to help set out items donated for the ‘white elephant’ stall at a Spring Fair. As we unpacked all sorts of interesting pieces of merchandise people no longer wanted and tried to find a spot for them on tables already grossly overflowing, I could not help but shake my head at it all. How could people give this good stuff away? Wouldn’t they miss such lovely and such useful things?

The next day at the fair itself, I soon became caught up in the whirl of excitement, as I hunted through all those bargains on offer. There were so many quality items at rock-bottom prices. I found some things I felt I needed for our kitchen and a picture or two for our walls and some very cheap gift wrapping and … On it went. I had such fun!

I took my precious purchases home, but later went back to see what was still on offer. And as I strolled around, this time in a quieter frame of mind and less bent on acquiring this and that, I began to realise what a wealthy country we live in. No, not all of us have money to spare. But, on the whole, we are well off. If we as a society can throw away so many ‘white elephants’—not only household items and other odds and ends but also an absolute mound of books—then we do not live in the poorest country in the world. At least all the recycling and finding of new owners I could see happening around me that I too had benefited from was a much better outcome than simply wasting these items and sending them to landfill.

As I looked around at all this offloading of possessions and buying and selling, however, I looked within myself as well. How easily I can get into an acquiring mode, thinking I need this and that! Yet what had I heard at church recently and read in Scripture about living in a humble and contented manner?

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. Matthew 6:19-21

But godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that. 1 Timothy 6:6-8

Will I be content with that? These words, along with all those white elephants I saw, have given me much to think about.

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